All solutions start with a connection

Every community has assets – whether it’s the long-time residents who know everyone on the block, kids headed to their first day of school or the entrepreneurial spirit of local business owners.

For more than three decades, the Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) has invested in the potential of people and places. We believe that working alongside neighbors and community leaders can lead to real, positive change for everyone. LIIF connects capital, partners and ideas to spark investment and empower communities to shape their own future.

Joint Letter From LIIF’s Chairs & President / CEO

Dear Friends:

Dear Friends:

In today’s environment, it can feel like we are moving from crisis to crisis. From natural disasters to the latest news headlines, it is hard to focus on the long view and to be reminded that there are neighbors, friends and families behind every story. We believe it is more important than ever to rededicate ourselves to our mission of poverty alleviation and continue to make long-term progress on issues like homelessness, displacement and income inequality. To achieve this, we must extend a...

In today’s environment, it can feel like we are moving from crisis to crisis. From natural disasters to the latest news headlines, it is hard to focus on the long view and to be reminded that there are neighbors, friends and families behind every story. We believe it is more important than ever to rededicate ourselves to our mission of poverty alleviation and continue to make long-term progress on issues like homelessness, displacement and income inequality. To achieve this, we must extend a hand, engage with others and come together to build and sustain safe, prosperous communities for all Americans.

LIIF’s investments are a reflection of our deeply held belief that real community transformation happens through partnership and collaboration. LIIF’s innovative capital resources serve as tools to support local leaders, ideas and people making change from the ground up. Since our founding, we’ve invested $2.1 billion – half of that was invested in just the last five years. We have leveraged $10 billion in other resources to build affordable homes, expand access to quality child care and schools, improve health outcomes and create more than 130,000 jobs across 31 states. This year, we’ve made significant strides in transforming communities together.

Justice and Equity: LIIF helped to lead the community development field in a paradigm shift that emphasized investing in both people and places. Now, we recognize that we must also add racial and gender equity into our vision and our practice. From launching the Strong, Prosperous, And Resilient Communities Challenge to revising our program investment strategies, LIIF is putting social justice at the heart of everything we do.

Expansion to the Southeast: Building on our previous investments in New Orleans, Atlanta and Memphis, LIIF is expanding our presence in the Southern U.S. We are committing both staff and resources to support community-building strategies in this region, including hiring our first team member based in Atlanta and launching a new program to expand educational opportunities in Tennessee.

LIIF Impact Note: We believe more people should be able to use their resources to invest in their community, while also earning a solid return. That’s why this fall we launched LIIF’s Impact Note, a simple, powerful way for everyday investors to expand economic opportunity and build communities where everyone can thrive.

Recently, while browsing an old LIIF annual report, we were reminded of some striking numbers: In LIIF’s first three years (1984-1987), we made 19 loans totaling $1.17 million, or about $400,000 per year. This past fiscal year, we deployed about $250 million to communities across the country.

LIIF’s scale and impact has grown exponentially over the years. Half of our total $2.1 billion was invested in the last five years alone. With this level of resources comes great responsibility to invest in those communities who need it most. Next year, LIIF will pass the torch to a new CEO. We expect to welcome new ideas while remaining rooted in our commitment to addressing poverty and creating more just economic and social outcomes.

We’re excited to share the stories of a few people and communities we’ve supported in this year’s annual report. Connect with us on Twitter (@liifund) and share your ideas about how you think we can transform communities together.

Sincerely,

Nancy O. Andrews
President & CEO

Andrew Ditton
Former Board Chair

Derek Douglas
Current Board Chair

Impact

Since 1984, LIIF has invested capital to improve people’s lives. Our investments have created jobs and expanded opportunity for millions of Americans, 97% of whom are low-income. By financing the elements that create great neighborhoods, like affordable homes, good schools, health clinics and quality child care, we help people become self-sufficient, stabilize communities and save public dollars. Learn more about our impact.

$2.1 billion

invested in communities

2.0 million

People served

$56.3 billion

In benefits to communities

Local Solutions to Building a Stronger Economy for All

In cities and towns around the country, local leaders are pioneering innovative solutions to make their hometowns healthier, more economically vibrant and more equitable. LIIF invests in the ideas, people and resources of communities to ensure that residents have a voice in and benefit from transforming the places they live.

It’s 8am and the Excelsior District is alive with the sounds of the city as parents wave goodbye to their children at Mission Child Care Consortium (MCCC), the largest single-building early care and learning center in San Francisco.

It’s 8am and the Excelsior District is alive with the sounds of the city as parents wave goodbye to their children at Mission Child Care Consortium (MCCC), the largest single-building early care and learning center in San Francisco.

Since its founding in 1971, demand for affordable child care grew rapidly while local businesses competed with rising rent and gentrification pressures. The center struggled to maintain a foothold in the Mission neighborhood before relocating farther from the city center. Then, in 2017, MCCC was dealt a 40% rent hike.

Since its founding in 1971, demand for affordable child care grew rapidly while local businesses competed with rising rent and gentrification pressures. The center struggled to maintain a foothold in the Mission neighborhood before relocating farther from the city center. Then, in 2017, MCCC was dealt a 40% rent hike.

“Mission Child Care would have had to close its doors,” said Joe Martinez, Executive Director of MCCC. “Where would those 200 children go? What would their families do without child care?”

The community rallied, and local government leaders, foundations and nonprofits came together to support MCCC. LIIF provided $4.3 million in capital to help finance the purchase of the facility, ensuring long-term stability for families and children.

“When we found out MCCC bought this building, everyone was overjoyed,” said teacher Sarah Barbo. “This is our kids’ second home now.”

“What I love most about the school is that it’s quality care for an affordable price. I could go somewhere else and pay $3,000/month but it might still not be this diverse and dependable.”

—Bianca Enriquez Lopez, parent and board member

224

children served annually

46

years in operation

Project Partners
  • Hellman Foundation
  • Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development
  • Mimi & Peter Haas Fund
  • Northern California Community Loan Fund
  • San Francisco Office of Early Care and Education

East Aldine has the feel of a small Texan town with swaths of open land dotted by homegrown businesses. An unincorporated district, the area is economically and socially isolated, despite its location less than 10 miles from Houston, the country’s fifth largest city. Of the town’s 53,000 residents, 34% of households have annual incomes of less than $25,000, and more than half do not have a high school education or equivalent.

East Aldine has the feel of a small Texan town with swaths of open land dotted by homegrown businesses. An unincorporated district, the area is economically and socially isolated, despite its location less than 10 miles from Houston, the country’s fifth largest city. Of the town’s 53,000 residents, 34% of households have annual incomes of less than $25,000, and more than half do not have a high school education or equivalent.

In lieu of broader regional opportunity, residents of East Aldine have built a local economy by investing in each other. Nearly 97% of retail space is occupied and 12% of the population are small business owners.

In lieu of broader regional opportunity, residents of East Aldine have built a local economy by investing in each other. Nearly 97% of retail space is occupied and 12% of the population are small business owners.

In 2018, BakerRipley will open the new Economic Opportunity Center to support this entrepreneurial spirit. The 43,000-square-foot facility, financed in part with New Markets Tax Credits from LIIF, will offer workforce development training, a maker space, business incubation center, financial services, flexible retail space and more.

“This center opens up the doors for technology, for building education, for people looking to start their own business,” said Raul Macias, a longtime resident of East Aldine.

The Economic Opportunity Center aims to build on the strengths of this community – resourcefulness, creativity and independence – and offer resources to expand economic opportunity throughout the region.

“A lot of neighbors liked the way I groomed my yard and an idea turned into an actual business. If I could get help in making this business better and protecting it, that’s where I could get the most help.”

—Rudy Bazan, East Aldine resident and small business owner

$10 million

in New Market Tax Credit allocation from LIIF

1,400

participants in workforce development training by 2020

Project Partners
  • BakerRipley
  • Chase Bank
  • Raza Development Fund

New Paths to Healthy Communities

Healthy communities enable families to live up to their full potential. But health means more than just access to health care. People that live in neighborhoods that are safe, affordable and connected to regional jobs and services have better health outcomes, which enables higher engagement in the workforce and reduces public health care expenditures.

The connections that helped create Crosstown Concourse, a 1.5 million-square-foot, mixed-use “vertical urban village,” were built through years of conversations among Memphis leaders, residents, business owners and artists. After sitting vacant for 17 years, the former Sears, Roebuck & Company factory and retail center is now a vibrant home for the arts, education, health, affordable housing and retail.

The connections that helped create Crosstown Concourse, a 1.5 million-square-foot, mixed-use “vertical urban village,” were built through years of conversations among Memphis leaders, residents, business owners and artists. After sitting vacant for 17 years, the former Sears, Roebuck & Company factory and retail center is now a vibrant home for the arts, education, health, affordable housing and retail.

LIIF provided New Market Tax Credits to help ensure that nonprofit and community organizations to could afford to be part of the new building, which is expected to host 3,000 visitors every day. One organization expecting increased foot traffic is ChurchHealth, a faith-based healthcare center that focuses on offering comprehensive services to the working uninsured.

LIIF provided New Market Tax Credits to help ensure that nonprofit and community organizations to could afford to be part of the new building, which is expected to host 3,000 visitors every day. One organization expecting increased foot traffic is ChurchHealth, a faith-based healthcare center that focuses on offering comprehensive services to the working uninsured.

“Being healthy is not just about the absence of disease,” said Dr. Scott Morris, CEO and practicing doctor at ChurchHealth. “We offer health coaching, fitness space and nutrition counseling, and it’s possible because we work in a building with other community organizations.”

ChurchHealth partners with the YMCA to manage 25,000 square feet of health and fitness space and runs free cooking classes for low-income individuals out of a commercial kitchen. “We moved to Crosstown to form partnerships,” said Dr. Morris. “Together, organizations like ours can have the most impact possible.”

“At Crosstown Concourse, I use the gym, the cooking program and mental health coaches. I can buy my groceries, go the post office and eat at a healthy restaurant all in one place.”

—Lisa Jones, ChurchHealth patient and regular visitor to Crosstown Concourse

1.5 million

square feet

800

jobs created

Project Partners
  • City of Memphis
  • Dudley Ventures
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Midwest Renewable Capital
  • National Trust Community Investment Corporation
  • SunTrust Bank
  • Urban Atlantic

Over the next decade, trillions of dollars in public and private funding will fuel bold new investments in infrastructure, transit, housing, health, climate resilience and sustainability. LIIF partnered with other leading national organizations to launch the Strong, Prosperous, And Resilient Communities Challenge (SPARCC) this spring to empower communities working to ensure that investments lead to equitable opportunities for everyone.

Over the next decade, trillions of dollars in public and private funding will fuel bold new investments in infrastructure, transit, housing, health, climate resilience and sustainability. LIIF partnered with other leading national organizations to launch the Strong, Prosperous, And Resilient Communities Challenge (SPARCC) this spring to empower communities working to ensure that investments lead to equitable opportunities for everyone.

SPARCC’s initial six regions are Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Memphis, Los Angeles and the Bay Area. While each site faces unique challenges, all are led by diverse collaborative tables and cross-sector partnerships working on concrete strategies advancing the areas of racial equity, climate resilience and health.

SPARCC’s initial six regions are Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Memphis, Los Angeles and the Bay Area. While each site faces unique challenges, all are led by diverse collaborative tables and cross-sector partnerships working on concrete strategies advancing the areas of racial equity, climate resilience and health.

In Denver, for example, Mile High Connects (MHC) is building on efforts to ensure that the $7.8 billion regional transit build-out benefits historically marginalized low-income communities and communities of color. MHC is working to reduce regional health disparities by providing flexible capital to spur development that benefits people and the environment and ensuring that diverse voices are part of city and regional planning conversations.

Low income communities in Denver currently suffer higher rates of asthma, a statistic which has been linked to neighborhoods’ proximity to highways and the resulting poor air quality. Through SPARCC, MHC is aiming to improve health outcomes for all of Denver’s residents.

“This investment comes at a critical time given the economic and development boom our region is experiencing. It will mean a great deal to low-income communities and communities of color.”

—Christine Márquez-Hudson, President and CEO of The Denver Foundation

6

geographic regions served

$90 million

to ensure equitable, healthy communities

250

local partners

Project Partners
  • Enterprise Community Partners
  • Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
  • Low Income Investment Fund
  • Natural Resources Defense Council
Funders
  • Ford Foundation
  • The JPB Foundation
  • The Kresge Foundation
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • The California Endowment

Opening the Door to a Home and Life

A home provides the foundation for the future: a place of stability, safety, dignity and health. This belief has been a cornerstone of LIIF’s work from day one. We invest in organizations that not only create affordable homes, but provide services like workforce training, counseling, health coaching and more – to turn housing into a building block for success for generations to come.

On a busy street near downtown Santa Ana, in Orange County, construction is under way on a new building being outfitted with rooftop solar panels, a courtyard patio and a commercial kitchen. But this is no luxury condo.

On a busy street near downtown Santa Ana, in Orange County, construction is under way on a new building being outfitted with rooftop solar panels, a courtyard patio and a commercial kitchen. But this is no luxury condo.

The Orchard is an $18 million affordable housing project, made possible in part by financing from LIIF, to enable Community Development Partners to renovate a former motel into 71 apartments for formerly homeless individuals and families. Once construction is complete, The Orchard will be Santa Ana’s single largest investment in permanent supportive housing addressing a worsening statewide homelessness crisis.

The Orchard is an $18 million affordable housing project, made possible in part by financing from LIIF, to enable Community Development Partners to renovate a former motel into 71 apartments for formerly homeless individuals and families. Once construction is complete, The Orchard will be Santa Ana’s single largest investment in permanent supportive housing addressing a worsening statewide homelessness crisis.

“After spending years on the street, I couldn’t believe it when I was offered an apartment,” said John C. Hacker III, a resident who lost his home after being hit by a car and unable to continue his career in construction.

The ultimate goal is to keep residents in stable housing long term by providing holistic supportive services like career counseling, mental health support and social activities.

“A lot of our residents are on food stamps and have mobility issues, and can’t access fresh, healthy food,” said Jacob Mize, an on-site housing stability specialist. “The community garden and dining hall offering three free meals a day is going to benefit them so much.”

“It’s wonderful living here. When I was living on the street, I was sick all the time, in and out of the hospital. Now I get to practice cooking. My quality of life has changed dramatically.”

—Katherina Kendron, resident

71

units of supportive housing created

1st

permanent housing project for homeless in Orange County

Project Partners
  • Community Development Partners
  • Golden State Acquisition Fund
  • Mercy House

Louise McNie used to live in the Brooklyn, NY, neighborhood where she now works as a tenant support coordinator with New Destiny Housing Corporation (New Destiny). The area feels safer, and there are more places to eat and shop, but rents are also much higher, which has meant some long-time residents have had to move. But stability and being able to stay in their homes and their community is part of what helps set New Destiny’s residents – half of whom are domestic violence survivors – on a path to success.

Louise McNie used to live in the Brooklyn, NY, neighborhood where she now works as a tenant support coordinator with New Destiny Housing Corporation (New Destiny). The area feels safer, and there are more places to eat and shop, but rents are also much higher, which has meant some long-time residents have had to move. But stability and being able to stay in their homes and their community is part of what helps set New Destiny’s residents – half of whom are domestic violence survivors – on a path to success.

LIIF provided $2 million in financing to renovate four of New Destiny’s apartment buildings with new floors, kitchens and bathrooms which had fallen into disrepair. Carolyn Bussey, a resident for 20 years, remembers, “I had come from a shelter and I had prayed to God. I had told him exactly what I wanted in an apartment... And a year later they called me for this apartment.” She now looks forward to hosting her son and her grandson in her new home.

LIIF provided $2 million in financing to renovate four of New Destiny’s apartment buildings with new floors, kitchens and bathrooms which had fallen into disrepair. Carolyn Bussey, a resident for 20 years, remembers, “I had come from a shelter and I had prayed to God. I had told him exactly what I wanted in an apartment... And a year later they called me for this apartment.” She now looks forward to hosting her son and her grandson in her new home.

In addition to housing, New Destiny provides social services to help residents become self-sufficient. For Louise, providing programs like homework help, employment readiness or first-time homeownership for residents like Carolyn, are what give her the most joy. “Faith and hope [keep me going], and seeing people change,” said Louise. “We had a tenant in the Bronx who actually bought a home. People don’t stay the same. People grow.”

“[Keeping these apartments] is a great benefit because the families are used to the neighborhood, the schools, and the community...they’re not getting pushed out. They’re able to afford the rent to stay.”

—Louise McNie, New Destiny Tenant Support Coordinator

430

individuals and families served across New York

23

years of providing safe shelter

Project Partners
  • Enterprise Community Investments
  • New Destiny Housing Corporation
  • New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development

Placing You at the Center of Solutions

LIIF is excited to announce the launch of the LIIF Impact Note: a simple, powerful way for everyday investors – like you – to expand economic opportunity and build communities where everyone can thrive. With the note, LIIF is making it possible for more people to participate in creating lasting impact while earning a return.

Join us to learn how meaningful investing can be. More at www.liifnote.org

track impact in regions you care about most

$1,000 minimum and no fees

1%—3% Competitive Return

Consolidated statements of financial position

As of June 30 2017 2016 2015
Assets
Cash and investments 34,795,691 42,894,761 21,877,891
Restricted cash 42,484,893 31,769,653 26,975,337
Notes receivable 329,259,261 284,454,624 229,836,878
Allowance for loan losses (9,956,112) (8,738,553) (7,642,972)
Other assets 17,570,309 7,157,950 9,576,129
Total Assets 414,154,042 357,538,435 280,623,263
Liabilities
Notes payable 276,012,426 242,029,511 169,672,399
Funds held in trust 16,001,705 15,076,380 10,002,986
Other liabilities 14,517,720 8,548,246 9,694,828
Total Liabilities 306,531,851 265,654,137 189,370,213
Unrestricted 57,059,610 52,143,029 44,293,272
Temporarily restricted 50,562,581 39,741,269 46,959,778
Total Net Assets 107,622,191 91,884,298 91,253,050
Total Liabilities and Net Assets 414,154,042 357,538,435 280,623,263

Consolidated statements of financial activities

As of June 30 2017 2016 2015
Revenue
Net financing income 10,840,196 10,422,026 8,776,707
Technical assistance and consulting 3,337,175 2,250,678 1,759,998
Grants and contributions 20,362,659 4,919,153 13,127,122
Other 3,420,209 4,339,652 3,093,459
Total Revenue 37,960,239 21,931,509 26,757,286
Expenses
Program expenses 15,144,762 15,328,304 11,755,633
Supporting expenses 7,077,584 5,971,957 5,234,465
Total Expenses 22,222,346 21,300,261 16,990,098
Change in unrestricted net assets 4,916,581 7,849,757 2,484,341
Change in temporarily restricted net assets 10,821,312 (7,218,509) 7,282,847
Change in Total Net Assets 15,737,893 631,248 9,767,188

Thanks to those who support our mission

  • Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • Bank of America
  • BBVA Compass
  • California Community Foundation
  • Capital One Foundation
  • Cathay Bank
  • Charles Schwab Bank
  • CIT Bank
  • Citi Foundation
  • City and County of San Francisco, Human Services Agency
  • City and County of San Francisco, Office of Early Care and Education
  • Deutsche Bank
  • Every Child Counts - First 5 Alameda
  • Ford Foundation
  • HSBC Bank USA, N.A.
  • JPB Foundation
  • Lee & Byron Stookey
  • Lee and Perry Smith Fund
  • Manufacturers Bank
  • Mercy Housing Inc.
  • Morgan Stanley
  • MUFG Union Bank Foundation
  • Orange County Community Foundation
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Signature Bank
  • TD Bank
  • The California Endowment
  • The Kresge Foundation
  • U.S. Bank Foundation
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury CDFI Fund
  • Weingart Foundation
  • Wells Fargo Foundation
  • Banc of America Community Development Corporation
  • Bank of America, N.A.
  • Blue Shield of California Life & Health Insurance Company
  • BBVA Compass
  • Capital One, N.A.
  • Charles Schwab Bank
  • Chase New Markets Corporation
  • Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas
  • Erich & Hannah Sachs Foundation
  • Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco
  • First Republic Bank
  • Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group
  • HSBC Bank USA, NA
  • Impact Community Capital, LLC
  • JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.
  • Mercy Investment Services, Inc.
  • Merrill Lynch
  • MetLife
  • Mizuho Bank (USA)
  • Morgan Stanley Bank, N.A.
  • New York Quarterly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends
  • Signature Bank
  • TD Bank USA, N.A.
  • The Congregation of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word
  • The David & Lucile Packard Foundation
  • The John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
  • The San Francisco Friends School
  • Trinity Health Corporation
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury CDFI Fund
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury Small Business Lending Fund
  • Wells Fargo Community Development Corporation
  • Banc of America Community Development Corporation
  • Boston Community Capital
  • Building Hope
  • California Department of Housing & Community Development
  • Calvert Social Investment Foundation
  • Capital Impact Partners
  • Century Housing Corporation
  • Citi Community Capital
  • City First Bank of DC
  • Civic Builders, Inc.
  • Clearinghouse CDFI
  • Community Development Commission of the County of Los Angeles
  • Community Reinvestment Fund, Inc.
  • Corporation for Supportive Housing
  • Empire State Development
  • Enterprise Community Loan Fund
  • ExED
  • Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
  • Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group
  • Housing Partnership Network
  • IFF
  • JPMorgan Chase Community Development Banking
  • Living Cities
  • Local Initiatives Support Corporation
  • Mercy Loan Fund
  • Morgan Stanley Bank, N.A.
  • Natural Resources Defense Council
  • New York City Acquisition Fund
  • New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development
  • New York City Retirement Systems
  • Nonprofit Finance Fund
  • Northern California Community Loan Fund
  • Northern Trust
  • Pacific Charter School Development
  • PNC Bank
  • Primary Care Development Corporation
  • Prudential Insurance Company of America
  • Raza Development Fund
  • Reinvestment Fund
  • Rural Community Assistance Corporation
  • San Francisco Mayor's Office of Housing and Community Development
  • Self-Help Credit Union
  • SJM Partners, Inc.
  • SunTrust Community Capital, LLC
  • TD Bank USA, N.A.
  • Telesis Corporation
  • The Federal Financing Bank
  • The Ford Foundation
  • The Kresge Foundation
  • The Rockefeller Foundation
  • The San Francisco Foundation
  • United Fund Advisors
  • U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury CDFI Fund
  • Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
  • Wespath Investment Management

LIIF Family

    • Derek Douglas / Chair

      Vice President for Civic Engagement and External Affairs, University of Chicago

    • Carol Naughton / Vice Chair

      President, Purpose Built Communities

    • Rey Ocañas / Secretary

      Executive VP, Director of Corporate Responsibility and Reputation, BBVA Compass

    • Russell Bruemmer / Treasurer

      Retired Partner, Wilmer Cutler, Pickering, Hale and Dorr

    • Laksiri Abeysekera

      Director Corporate Services, International Center for Biosaline Agriculture

    • Nancy O. Andrews

      President & CEO, Low Income Investment Fund

    • Janis Bowdler

      Managing Director, JPMorgan Chase

    • Phyllis Caldwell

      Formerly Chief Homeownership Preservation Officer, U.S. Department of Treasury

    • David Fleming

      Vice President, Public Health Impact, PATH

    • Donna Gambrell

      Former Director of the CDFI Fund

    • Pamela S. Johnson

      Founder (retired), PSJ Advisors

    • William C. Kelly, Jr.

      Founder, Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future

    • Daniel Nissenbaum

      Director, Community Reinvestment Act Programs, Urban Investment Group, Goldman Sachs

    • Roy Swan

      Managing Director, Morgan Stanley, CEO, Morgan Stanley Impact SBIC, COO, Morgan Stanley Community Investments

Eastern Region Advisory Committee

    • David Beer

      Breaking Ground

    • Amy Brusiloff

      Bank of America

    • Sondra Ford

      JPMorgan Chase

    • Beth Gilroy

      MUFG Union Bank, N.A.

    • John Kimble

      Deutsche Bank

    • Becky Koch

      HSBC Bank USA, N.A.

    • Lesley Palmer

      Mizuho Bank, Ltd.

    • Mariadele Priest

      Capital One

    • Rebecca Regan

      Housing Partnership Network

Loan Committee

    • Phyllis Caldwell / Chair

      Formerly U.S. Department of Treasury

    • Pam Johnson

      Formerly Fannie Mae

    • William Kelly

      Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future

    • Dan Nissenbaum

      Goldman Sachs

    • Reymundo Ocañas

      BBVA Compass

New Markets Tax Credit Advisory Board

    • Sabrina Ayala

      Green Dot Public Schools

    • Sara Batterton

      Uncommon Schools

    • Kathleen Brownlee

      Purpose Built Communities

    • Kim Dempsey

      Kresge Foundation

    • Ted Lempert

      Children Now

    • Kimberly McKay

      BRIDGE Housing

    • William O’Brien

      Primary Care Development Corporation

    • Andrew Reicher

      Urban Homesteading Assistance Board

San Francisco Child Care Facilities Fund Program Advisory Committee

    • Fonda Davidson

      Cross Cultural Family Center

    • Graham Dobson

      San Francisco Office of Early Care and Education

    • Rosemarie Kennedy

      Family Child Care Association of San Francisco

    • Sally Large

      Friends of St. Francis Day Care

    • Mona Malan

      Children’s Council of San Francisco

    • Michael Neumann

      Wu Yee Children’s Services

    • Maria Luz Torre

      Parent Voices

Western Region Advisory Committee

    • Allison Brooks

      Bay Area Regional Collaborative

    • Maria Bustria-Glickman

      U.S. Bank Community Development Corporation

    • Suny Lay Chang

      LINC Housing

    • David Erickson

      Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

    • Tiena Johnson-Hall

      BBVA Compass

    • Laura Kozel

      Rocketship Education

    • Richard Mandel

      California Housing Partnership Corporation

    • Dean Matsubayashi

      Little Tokyo Service Center

    • Adam Miller

      EdTec

    • Craig Adelman

      Managing Director, SPARCC Initiative

    • Ki Allen

      IT Director

    • Nancy O. Andrews

      President & CEO

    • Nadine Atieh

      Director of Financial Planning & Analysis and Capital Management

    • Rachel Bluestein

      VP, Strategic Initiatives & Programs

    • Diane Borradaile

      SVP, National Markets & Capital Solutions

    • Craig Fox

      Director of Accounting

    • Melissa Garcia

      Director of National Lending Initiatives

    • Patricia GoPaul

      General Counsel

    • Jonathan Harwitz

      Managing Director, Federal Policy & Government Affairs

    • Samantha Hojo

      Director of Communications

    • Roxanne Huey

      VP, Finance & Corporate Controller

    • Susan Hyman

      Chief Credit Officer

    • Kimberley Latimer-Nelligan

      Chief Operating Officer, EVP, Community Investments & Programs

    • Amy Laughlin

      Director, National New Market Tax Credits

    • Sajan Philip

      Director, Central Region and Washington, D.C.

    • Brian Prater

      EVP, Strategy, Development & Public Affairs

    • Kathy Rock

      EVP, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Administrative Officer

    • Kirsten Shaw

      Director, Eastern Region

    • Jessica Standiford

      Director of Development and Impact Investing

    • Martina Valentine

      Director of Lending Operations

    • Candace Wong

      Director, California Child Development Programs

Stay Connected

As a leading national community development financial institution, the Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) invests capital to support healthy families and communities. LIIF employs a holistic approach by investing in strategies that connect people, places and opportunity: affordable housing, child care, quality education, health and transit-oriented development. LIIF provides loans, grants and technical assistance and works to advance policies that increase economic opportunity and mobility for low income people.